Delayed period after laparoscopy

Delayed period after laparoscopy

Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive type of surgery that is often used to investigate or treat fertility issues, though it is also used for other common types of abdominal or pelvic surgery such as an appendectomy, gallbladder removal, or gastric band placement. During the laparoscopy, your surgeon will make an incision in your abdomen, typically under your bellybutton. Next, a small tube called a cannula is inserted into the opening. The cannula is used to inflate the abdomen with gas, usually carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide. This helps your surgeon to see the inside of your abdomen more clearly.

Because it is so common, and because of its use in reproductive medicine, patients often have questions about how this kind of surgery might affect their delayed periode after laparoscopy, first periode after laparoscopy and no peride after laparoscopy.

Delays in the period

Here’s everything you need to know about peride after a laparoscopy:

  • Experiences with the first period after a laparoscopy can vary dramatically. If your period is more painful, longer, or heavier than usual, don’t panic. Internal healing takes much longer than external healing. Therefore, your first few periods may be more painful. However, if you are concerned about the degree of pain, or if your pain is severe, contact your doctor.
  • Right after the laparoscopy you may have heavy discharge and even bleeding very similar to the menstrual period. Such bleeding can last up to 3 weeks but usually it goes in a week or turns into a regular period. You should seek your doctor’s advice if you have bad pain or heavy bleeding.
  • Laparascopy is usually done on the 7th – 10th day of the cycle before ovulation. If there are no complications, you are unlikely to have a missed period after laparoscopy. The period may move a couple of days but the cycle doesn’t break as a whole.
  • After laparoscopic surgery in the forty-first day of practice due to stress, hormonal changes that might be causing the delay period.
  • If you did not have problems with ovulation before laparoscopy, you should not have them after this diagnostic operation. That is why you should expect to have it as usual. Remember that having 1-2 anovulatory cycles per year is a norm and do not worry if the following cycle after laparoscopy turns out to be anovulatory.
  • Experiences with the first menstrual period vary dramatically. If your period is more painful, longer, or heavier than usual, don’t panic. Internal healing takes much longer than external healing. Therefore, your first few periods may be more painful. However, if you are concerned about the degree of pain, or if your pain is severe, contact your doctor.

Reference:

https://www.endometriosis-uk.org/your-laparoscopy

http://firstwomenfoundation.com/helpful-information/99-pregnancy-after-laparoscopy.html

http://endometriosis.org/resources/articles/laparoscopy-before-and-after-tips/

https://youngwomenshealth.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Preparing-For-Your-Laparoscopy.pdf