What could be the reason for ongoing spotting after laparoscopic surgery?

Even though you have symptoms of endometriosis, the only way for your doctor to diagnose it is by performing a laparoscopy. You’ll get general anesthesia, meaning you won’t be awake. Your surgeon can remove any endometriosis scarring and lesions during the laparoscopy, as well. Depending on how much endometriosis the surgeon has to remove, the procedure can last anywhere from 30 minutes to 6 hours or more.

After surgery You may experience some pain when you wake up. Make sure to discuss your symptoms with your doctor so she can manage your care and help make you comfortable. You’ll probably be tired for the first few days after surgery, as well. You may not be able to drive, have sex, swim, or bathe (showering is OK) until your doctor tells you otherwise. Some bleeding after a hysterectomy is normal. In the 6 to 8 weeks following the procedure, a certain amount of bleeding or spotting can be expected. After all, a hysterectomy is a major surgery involving the removal of a significant amount of tissue. Knowing the difference between normal and abnormal bleeding can help prevent serious complications, including infection and uterine injury. You may have vaginal bleeding or spotting for the first week or so following surgery. Do not douche, use a tampon, or have intercourse until your doctor indicates that it is okay to do so.

Normal vs. Abnormal Bleeding

After hysterectomy and certain vaginal operations, you may experience vaginal discharge and/or bleeding. Normal post-operative bleeding lasts from several days to several weeks after surgery. After the first couple of days the bleeding turns into spotting – normally dark red, but some occasional bright red spotting is not cause for alarm. On most instances, the bleeding stops for good. Occasionally, at 2-8 weeks after surgery, there may be some bright red vaginal spotting due to dissolving suture. The timing will depend on the type of suture that was used and how quickly it dissolves. This may be spontaneous bright red spotting (it is rarely ever heavy) or it may happen after intercourse or physical activity. Perineal pads should be used during this time for any discharge, spotting, or bleeding. Do not use tampons.

However, if you experience heavy bright red bleeding, or you must change your pad more than once per hour, please notify your physician. Sometimes, bleeding can occur at other times (even up to years later). Most often this is caused by granulation tissue. This is not serious, but should be reported to your doctor so the source of the bleeding can be confirmed and treated. Douching should not be done unless you are specifically instructed to do so. Of course, if you have had a hysterectomy you will no longer menstruate, although you may see some spotting for a few weeks. Other operations involving the uterus, tubes, or ovaries may interrupt the schedule for your menstrual cycle. It may take up to a month or two before your periods resume a regular pattern. If you have had your ovaries removed, you will experience instant menopause and may be offered hormone replacement therapy.

The key sign that you are healing normally is that the bleeding will begin to decrease in the days following the surgery. On the other hand, if there is a sudden and significant increase in bleeding, that would be considered abnormal. Bleeding should steadily decrease in the days and weeks following the surgery and should never be excessive at any point in your recovery.  You may experience some pain when you wake up. Make sure to discuss your symptoms with your doctor so she can manage your care and help make you comfortable. You’ll probably be tired for the first few days after surgery, as well. You may not be able to drive, have sex, swim, or bathe (showering is OK) until your doctor tells you otherwise.

Reference:

https://www.verywellhealth.com/bleeding-after-a-hysterectomy-3156906

https://www.rhgynob.com/for-patients/about-your-surgery/patient-instructions/

https://www.webmd.com/women/endometriosis/laparoscopic-surgery#1